Publications - Learning Center

Here you’ll find downloadable whitepapers, articles, posts, and other materials that can help you understand more about liquid cooling technology that cen help you make informed decisions about data center cooling.

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Negative Pressure Liquid Cooling – TechVision Research

Water-Cooled Servers Common Designs, Components, and Processes

Moderating the Impact of Integrating Water-Cooled Servers Into Data Centres

Liquid Cooling Technologies for Data Centers and Edge Applications

Two-Phase, or Not Two-Phase?

Cooling Performance Testing of Attaway's Negative Pressure CDU

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Sandia’s Liquid Cooled Data Center Boosts Efficiency and Resiliency

Five Reasons to Adopt Liquid Cooling

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Negative Pressure Liquid Cooling – TechVision Research

Negative Pressure Liquid Cooling – TechVision Research

A variety of technology, business and market factors are driving increased demand for liquid cooling solutions. This demand was initially focused on supporting the cooling of supercomputers and high-performance applications, but it is expanding to a far broader range of hardware throughout data centers, cloud computing/co-location facilities and a wide variety of other use cases.The single biggest barrier to widespread adoption is the perceived (and real) fear that a leak will cause severe damage to expensive hardware and cause extended downtime. Data center managers and IT executives are increasingly risk adverse and this has limited the initial receptivity for these solutions.
This short paper addresses the value proposition associated with the use of a negative pressure liquid cooling solution and how it differs from legacy data center cooling approaches

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Water-Cooled Servers Common Designs, Components, and Processes

Water-Cooled Servers Common Designs, Components, and Processes

With more water-cooled IT products arriving in the marketplace, ASHRAE TC 9.9 felt the need to outline some of the common processes, parts, and materi- als for focus in use for future water-cooled designs. Some parts in a water-cooled IT system will be specific to the product design, such as cold plates, manifolds, arrangement of piping, pumps, valves, and so on, but others such as quick con- nects, hoses, hose connections, materials, and water chemistry fall more into the category of common parts that can be used by all current and potential manufac- turers of water-cooled IT equipment. This white paper is an attempt to provide and make available those items that could be classified as common. The material published in this white paper compliments the materials published in Liquid Cool- ing Guidelines for Datacom Equipment Centers, second edition (ASHRAE 2014).
Beyond the objective stated above, this white paper also corrects misunder- standings in the latest edition of Liquid Cooling Guidelines for Datacom Equip- ment Centers, and provides guidance for avoiding common mistakes based upon the book’s content. We also expect that much of the content in this white paper will be incorporated into a future third edition.

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Moderating the Impact of Integrating Water-Cooled Servers Into Data Centres

Moderating the Impact of Integrating Water-Cooled Servers Into Data Centres

Water-cooled IT equipment represents a new paradigm for datacom centre operators. As with any new approach to doing things, education will play a large role in the successful implementation of water cooling. Although most of the general rules for current air-cooled implementations apply, datacom centre operators should have cooling contingency plans; implement cooling system redundancy; deploy critical subsystems, such as pumps that have high reliability and availability; and one should place subsystems such as pumps (water, refrigerant, dielectric) and rack-based cooling systems on uninterruptible power supply (UPS). There are, however, some areas of water cooling that require special attention: temperature control, prevention of condensation, TCS water cleanliness, wetted material requirements and water chemistry.

This article was originally printed in the July 2019 edition of the ASHRAE Journal. Go here to purchase a copy.

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Liquid Cooling Technologies

Liquid Cooling Technologies for Data Centers and Edge Applications

Increasing IT chip densities, a focus on energy efficiency, and new IT use cases like harsh edge computing environments are driving the interest and adoption of liquid cooling. In this paper we present the fundamentals of liquid cooling, describe the advantages over conventional air cooling, and explain the 5 main direct to chip and immersive methods. To help guide the selection of the appropriate liquid cooling method for a given need, we explain the key attributes that must be considered.

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Two Phase or Not Two-Phase?

Two-Phase, or Not Two-Phase?

Two-Phase, or Not Two-Phase. After all, that is the question. At least it is for data center cooling architects and planners seeking to maximize cooling efficiency and performance for their ever-growing fleets of servers with the use of liquid-cooling. The use of water-based cold plate and dielectric immersion liquid cooling solutions have seen rapid increases in adoption over the past few product generations with a growth rate that continues to accelerate. With the acceptance (or to borrow the cliché “democratization”) of liquid in the data center, would-be customers of liquid-cooled servers are now turning their attention towards two-phase (or latent) liquid cooling technologies based upon these fluids’ non-conductive properties and potential for improved performance and efficiency when compared to water-based cold plate and single-phase immersion solutions.

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Cooling Performance Testing of Attaway's Negitive Pressure CDU

Cooling Performance Testing of Attaway's Negative Pressure CDU

Two-Phase, or Not Two-Phase. After all, that is the question. At least it is for data center cooling architects and planners seeking to maximize cooling efficiency and performance for their ever-growing fleets of servers with the use of liquid-cooling. The use of water-based cold plate and dielectric immersion liquid cooling solutions have seen rapid increases in adoption over the past few product generations with a growth rate that continues to accelerate. With the acceptance (or to borrow the cliché “democratization”) of liquid in the data center, would-be customers of liquid-cooled servers are now turning their attention towards two-phase (or latent) liquid cooling technologies based upon these fluids’ non-conductive properties and potential for improved performance and efficiency when compared to water-based cold plate and single-phase immersion solutions. These changes include an immediate change from an idle compute load to full load (Linpack) as well as running Linpack without any water cooling from Attaway's CDUs. It was discovered that Attaway could respond to sudden compute load changes very well, never throttling any nodes. When Linpack was run without water cooling, the system was able to operate for a short time before throttling happened.

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Sandia HPC Liquid Cooling Case Study

Sandia’s Liquid Cooled Data Center Boosts Efficiency and Resiliency

When Sandia installed the 650-kW Attaway supercomputer at their Albuquerque HPC data center in 2019, they sought innovative cooling concepts that would reduce the massive computer system’s significant energy use. Technology partner Chilldyne offered a unique solution: a liquid system that operates under vacuum pressure for resilient, energy-efficient data center cooling.

The Chilldyne cooling system was built with redundancy/resilience in mind: If one element were to fail, others would continue keeping the system cool and the equipment safe.

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Five Reasons to Adapt Liquid Cooling

Five Reasons to Adopt Liquid Cooling

IT equipment chip densities has been the commonly discussed driver for adopting liquid cooling. But, there are four other reasons why data center owners should consider liquid cooling including low PUE targets, space constraints, harsh IT environment, and water restrictions. This paper describes these reasons. With this information, data center owners can make an informed decision on whether liquid cooling has advantages for their application.

Power Savings Chart

Cooling and power systems use as much electricity as your servers do.

What if you could dedicate more power to servers with no increase in overall power consumption? .

Demonstrated Power Savings

Liquid cooling delivers significant power reductions. Chiller power, fan power and processor power all go down with liquid. Reductions that can be reclaimed in increased performance, cost savings, or part of a green initiative.

Liquid Cooling Power Savings

Potential Savings

Negative pressure. Positive results.

Negative pressure, highly efficient water-based liquid cooling with no leaks, no harmful chemicals and no downtime.

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